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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.  20549
 
FORM 10-Q 
(Mark One) 
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021  
or
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _________________________ to _________________________________
 
Commission File Number:  0-17196
https://cdn.kscope.io/5054de050798cfd6d342a41d62f74b09-mgpi-20210331_g1.jpg 
MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) 
Kansas45-4082531
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

100 Commercial Street
AtchisonKansas66002
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip Code)
(913) 367-1480
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading SymbolName of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, no par valueMGPINASDAQ Global Select Market
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  x Yes No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). x Yes No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an “emerging growth company.”  See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer                                                         x Accelerated filer
 Non-accelerated filer (Do not check if smaller reporting company)    Smaller Reporting Company
Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes x No

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 
21,950,862 shares of Common Stock, no par value as of April 29, 2021



INDEX
 
Page
  
  
    
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 

METHOD OF PRESENTATION

Throughout this Report, when we refer to “the Company,” “MGP,” “we,” “us,” “our,” and words of similar import, we are referring to the combined business of MGP Ingredients, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries, except to the extent that the context otherwise indicates. In this document, for any references to Note 1 through Note 11, refer to the Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1.
 
All amounts in this report, except for share, par values, bushels, gallons, pounds, mmbtu, proof gallons, per share, per bushel, per gallon, per proof gallon and percentage amounts, are shown in thousands unless otherwise noted.

2


PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 Quarter Ended March 31,
 20212020
Sales$108,323 $99,082 
Cost of sales76,024 75,871 
Gross profit32,299 23,211 
Selling, general and administrative expenses11,799 9,503 
Operating income20,500 13,708 
Interest expense, net and other(458)(642)
Income before income taxes20,042 13,066 
Income tax expense4,615 3,224 
Net income15,427 9,842 
Income attributable to participating securities146 66 
Net income attributable to common shareholders and used in Earnings Per Share calculation$15,281 $9,776 
Basic and diluted weighted average common shares16,928,003 17,013,925 
Basic and diluted Earnings Per Share$0.90 $0.57 
 























See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements
3


MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands)

Quarter Ended March 31,
 20212020
Net income$15,427 $9,842 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:
Change in Company-sponsored post-employment benefit plan55 (6)
Comprehensive income$15,482 $9,836 












































See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements
4


       MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands)
 March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Current Assets  
Cash and cash equivalents$22,586 $21,662 
Receivables (less allowance for credit losses, $100 and $24 at March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively)
67,147 56,966 
Inventory136,087 141,011 
Prepaid expenses3,728 2,644 
Total current assets229,548 222,283 
Property, plant, and equipment323,551 313,730 
Less accumulated depreciation and amortization(184,932)(181,738)
Property, plant, and equipment, net138,619 131,992 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net 4,606 5,151 
Other assets8,329 7,149 
Total assets$381,102 $366,575 
Current Liabilities  
Current maturities of long-term debt$2,400 $1,600 
Accounts payable28,545 30,273 
Income taxes payable5,941 704 
Accrued expenses and other18,117 20,752 
Total current liabilities55,003 53,329 
Long-term debt, less current maturities37,476 38,271 
Long-term operating lease liabilities2,593 3,057 
Deferred credits1,394 2,196 
Other noncurrent liabilities4,475 4,898 
Deferred income taxes1,650 2,298 
Total liabilities102,591 104,049 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 8)
Stockholders’ Equity  
Capital stock  
Preferred, 5% non-cumulative; $10 par value; authorized 1,000 shares; issued and outstanding 437 shares
4 4 
Common stock  
No par value; authorized 40,000,000 shares; issued 18,115,965 shares at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020; and 16,940,600 and 16,915,862 shares outstanding at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively
6,715 6,715 
Additional paid-in capital18,016 15,503 
Retained earnings276,318 262,943 
Accumulated other comprehensive income541 486 
Treasury stock, at cost, 1,175,365 and 1,200,103 shares at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively
(23,083)(23,125)
Total stockholders’ equity278,511 262,526 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity$381,102 $366,575 
See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements
5


MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands)
 Quarter Ended March 31,
 20212020
Cash Flows from Operating Activities  
Net income$15,427 $9,842 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:  
Depreciation and amortization3,311 3,125 
Loss on sale of assets (9)
Share-based compensation3,229 1,139 
Deferred income taxes, including change in valuation allowance(648)101 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:  
Receivables, net(4,348)(11,453)
Inventory4,924 (5,649)
Prepaid expenses(1,084)(2,339)
Income taxes payable5,237 3,100 
Accounts payable509 1,635 
Accrued expenses and other(8,385)1,003 
Deferred credits(802)(81)
Other, net(380)128 
Net cash provided by operating activities16,990 542 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities  
Additions to property, plant, and equipment(12,059)(5,645)
Acquisition of business (2,750)
Proceeds from sale of property 366 
Other, net(1,281)(160)
Net cash used in investing activities(13,340)(8,189)
Cash Flows from Financing Activities  
Payment of dividends and dividend equivalents(2,052)(2,060)
Purchase of treasury stock(674)(4,395)
Loan fees paid related to borrowings (1,148)
Principal payments on long-term debt (100)
Proceeds from credit agreement - revolver 54,700 
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities(2,726)46,997 
Increase in cash and cash equivalents924 39,350 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period21,662 3,309 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period$22,586 $42,659 

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements
6


MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
For Quarter Ended March 31, 2021 and 2020
(Unaudited) (Dollars in thousands)
Capital
Stock
Preferred
Issued CommonAdditional
Paid-In
Capital
Retained
Earnings
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
income
Treasury
Stock
Total
Balance, December 31, 2020
$4 $6,715 $15,503 $262,943 $486 $(23,125)$262,526 
Comprehensive income:
Net income   15,427   15,427 
Other comprehensive income    55  55 
Dividends and dividend equivalents of $0.12 per common share and per restricted stock unit, net of estimated forfeitures
   (2,052)  (2,052)
Share-based compensation  3,229    3,229 
Stock shares awarded, forfeited or vested  (716)  716  
Stock shares repurchased     (674)(674)
Balance, March 31, 2021
$4 $6,715 $18,016 $276,318 $541 $(23,083)$278,511 




Capital
Stock
Preferred
Issued CommonAdditional
Paid-In
Capital
Retained
Earnings
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
Treasury
Stock
Total
Balance, December 31, 2019
$4 $6,715 $14,029 $230,784 $(246)$(20,242)$231,044 
Comprehensive income:
Net income— — — 9,842 — — 9,842 
Other comprehensive loss— — — — (6)— (6)
Dividends and dividend equivalents of $0.12 per common share and per restricted stock unit, net of estimated forfeitures
— — — (2,059)— — (2,059)
Share-based compensation— — 902 — — — 902 
Stock shares awarded, forfeited or vested— — (567)— — 804 237 
Stock shares repurchased— — — — — (4,395)(4,395)
Balance, March 31, 2020
$4 $6,715 $14,364 $238,567 $(252)$(23,833)$235,565 


See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

7



MGP INGREDIENTS, INC.
 NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Dollars in thousands, unless otherwise noted)

Note 1.  Accounting Policies and Basis of Presentation

The Company. MGP Ingredients, Inc. (“the Company,” and “MGP”) is a Kansas corporation headquartered in Atchison, Kansas and is a leading producer and supplier of premium distilled spirits and specialty wheat protein and starch food ingredients. Distilled spirits include premium bourbon and rye whiskeys and grain neutral spirits, including vodka and gin. MGP is also a top producer of high quality industrial alcohol for use in both food and non-food applications. The Company’s protein and starch food ingredients provide a host of functional, nutritional, and sensory benefits for a wide range of food products to serve the packaged goods industry. The Company’s distillery products are derived from corn and other grains (including rye, barley, wheat, barley malt, and milo), and its ingredient products are derived from wheat flour.  The majority of the Company’s sales are made directly, or through distributors, to manufacturers and processors of finished packaged goods or to bakeries.

Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements as of and for the quarter ended March 31, 2021, should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).  The results of operations for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments (consisting of normal and recurring adjustments) necessary to fairly present the results for interim periods in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”).  Pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC, certain information and note disclosures normally included in the financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP have been condensed or omitted.

Use of Estimates.  The financial reporting policies of the Company conform to GAAP.  The preparation of unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  The application of certain of these policies places demands on management’s judgment, with financial reporting results relying on estimation about the effects of matters that are inherently uncertain, inclusive of the effects related to COVID-19.  For all of these policies, management cautions that future events rarely develop as forecast, and estimates routinely require adjustment and may require material adjustment.

Inventory.  Inventory includes finished goods, raw materials in the form of agricultural commodities used in the production process and certain maintenance and repair items.  Bourbon and whiskeys are normally aged in barrels for several years, following industry practice; all barreled bourbon and whiskey is classified as a current asset. The Company includes warehousing, insurance, and other carrying charges applicable to barreled whiskey in inventory costs.

8


Inventories are stated at lower of cost or net realizable value on the first-in, first-out, or FIFO, method.  Inventory valuations are impacted by constantly changing prices paid for key materials, primarily corn. Inventory consists of the following:
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Finished goods$18,767 $16,414 
Barreled distillate (bourbons and whiskeys)98,736 105,445 
Raw materials6,165 6,954 
Work in process2,017 1,805 
Maintenance materials8,907 8,634 
Other1,495 1,759 
Total$136,087 $141,011 

Revenue Recognition. Revenue is recognized when control of the promised goods or services, through performance obligations by the Company, is transferred to the customer in an amount that reflects the consideration it expects to be entitled to receive in exchange for the performance obligations. The term between invoicing and when payment is due is not significant and the period between when the entity transfers the promised good or service to the customer and when the customer pays for that good or service is one year or less.

Excise taxes that are both imposed on and concurrent with a specific revenue-producing transaction, that are collected by the Company from a customer are excluded from revenue. Revenue is recognized for the sale of products at the point in time finished products are delivered to the customer in accordance with shipping terms. This is a faithful depiction of the satisfaction of the performance obligation because, at the point control passes to the customer, the customer has legal title and the risk and rewards of ownership have transferred, and the customer has present obligation to pay.

The Company’s Distillery Products segment routinely enters into bill and hold arrangements, whereby the Company produces and sells aged and unaged distillate to customers, and the product is barreled at the customer’s request and warehoused at a Company location for an extended period of time in accordance with directions received from the Company’s customers. Even though the aged and unaged distillate remains in the Company’s possession, a sale is recognized at the point in time when the customer obtains control of the product. Control is transferred to the customer in bill and hold transactions when: customer acceptance specifications have been met, legal title has transferred, the customer has a present obligation to pay for the product, and the risk and rewards of ownership have transferred to the customer. Additionally, all of the following bill and hold criteria have to be met in order for control to be transferred to the customer: the reason for the bill and hold arrangement is substantive - the customer has requested the product be warehoused, the product has been identified as separately belonging to the customer, the product is currently ready for physical transfer to the customer, and the Company does not have the ability to use the product or direct it to another customer.

Warehouse services revenue is recognized over the time that warehouse services are rendered and as they are rendered. This is a faithful depiction of the satisfaction of the performance obligation because control of the aging products has already passed to the customer and there are no additional performance activities required by the Company, except as requested by the customer. The performance of the service activities, as requested, is invoiced as satisfied and revenue is concurrently recognized.

Recognition of Insurance Recoveries. Estimated loss contingencies are recognized as charges to income when they are probable and reasonably estimable. Insurance recoveries are not recognized until all contingencies related to the insurance claim have been resolved and settlement has been reached with the insurer. Insurance recoveries, to the extent of costs and losses, are reported as a reduction to costs on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Insurance recoveries, in excess of costs and losses, if any, would be reported as a separate caption in Operating income on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Legally committed recovery amounts obtained prior to contingencies being resolved are recorded in Accrued expenses and other on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Income Taxes. The Company accounts for income taxes using an asset and liability method which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis. A valuation allowance is recognized if it is “more likely than not” that at least some portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

Earnings Per Share (“EPS”).  Basic and diluted EPS are computed using the two-class method, which is an earnings allocation formula that determines net income per share for each class of Common Stock and participating security according to
9


dividends declared and participation rights in undistributed earnings.  Per share amounts are computed by dividing net income attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average shares outstanding during each year during the period.

Business Combinations. Assets acquired and liabilities assumed during a business combination are generally recorded at fair market value as of the acquisition date. Goodwill is recognized to the extent that the purchase consideration exceeds the assets acquired and liabilities assumed. The Company uses its best estimate and third party valuation specialists to determine the fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed. During the measurement period, which can be up to one year after the acquisition date, the Company can make adjustments to the fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, with the offset being an adjustment to goodwill.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets. The Company records goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets in connection with various acquisitions of businesses and allocates the goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets to its respective reporting units. The Company tests goodwill for impairment at least annually, in the fourth quarter, or on an interim basis if events and circumstances occur that would indicate it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than the carrying value. To the extent that the carrying amount exceeds fair value, an impairment of goodwill is recognized and allocated to the reporting units. Judgment is required in the determination of reporting units, the assignment of assets and liabilities to reporting units, including goodwill, and the determination of fair value of the reporting units. The fair value of the reporting units was estimated using third party independent appraisals. The Company separately evaluates indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment. As of March 31, 2021, the Company determined that goodwill and indefinite lived intangible assets were not impaired.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments.  The Company determines the fair values of its financial instruments based on a fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy is broken down into three levels based upon the observability of inputs. Fair values determined by Level 1 inputs utilize quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Company has the ability to access. Level 2 inputs include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets and inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability, and include situations where there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability. In certain cases, the inputs used to measure fair value may fall into different levels of the fair value hierarchy. In such cases, the level in the fair value hierarchy within which the fair value measurement in its entirety falls has been determined based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement in its entirety. The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value in its entirety requires judgment and considers factors specific to the asset or liability.
 
The Company’s short term financial instruments include cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivables and accounts payable.  The carrying value of the short term financial instruments approximates the fair value due to their short term nature. These financial instruments have no stated maturities or the financial instruments have short term maturities that approximate market.
 
The fair value of the Company’s debt is estimated based on current market interest rates for debt with similar maturities and credit quality. The fair value of the Company’s debt was $44,364 and $44,548 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. The financial statement carrying value of total debt was $39,876 (including unamortized loan fees) and $39,871 (including unamortized loan fees) at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.  These fair values are considered Level 2 under the fair value hierarchy. Fair value disclosure for deferred compensation plan investments is included in Note 9.

Recently Adopted Accounting Standard Updates. The Company did not adopt any new Accounting Standard Updates during the quarter ended March 31, 2021.

Note 2.  Revenue

The Company generates revenues from the Distillery Products segment by the sale of products and by providing warehouse services related to the storage and aging of customer products. The Company generates revenues from the Ingredient Solutions segment by the sale of products. Revenue related to sales of products is recognized at a point in time whereas revenue generated from warehouse services is recognized over time. Contracts with customers include a single performance obligation (either the sale of products or the provision of warehouse services).
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The following table presents the Company’s sales by segment and major products and services:

Quarter Ended March 31,
20212020
Distillery Products
Brown goods$43,415 $29,070 
White goods16,853 16,902 
Premium beverage alcohol60,268 45,972 
Industrial alcohol17,336 21,618 
Food grade alcohol77,604 67,590 
Fuel grade alcohol2,517 1,522 
Distillers feed and related co-products4,972 6,989 
Warehouse services4,101 3,901 
Total Distillery Products89,194 80,002 
Ingredient Solutions
Specialty wheat starches10,222 10,212 
Specialty wheat proteins6,046 6,365 
Commodity wheat starches2,283 1,877 
Commodity wheat proteins578 626 
Total Ingredient Solutions19,129 19,080 
Total sales$108,323 $99,082 

Note 3. Business Acquisition

On January 22, 2021, the Company entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Luxco, Inc. and its affiliated companies (“Luxco”, or “Luxco Companies”), and subsequently completed the merger on April 1, 2021. Luxco is a leading branded beverage alcohol company across various categories, with a more than 60-year business heritage. As a result of the Luxco acquisition, MGP expects to increase its scale and market position in the branded-spirits sector and strengthen its platform for future growth of higher valued-added products.

Following the merger, the Luxco Companies became wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Company. The aggregate consideration paid by the Company in connection with the merger was $237,500 in cash (less assumed indebtedness) and 5,007,833 shares of common stock of the Company, subject to adjustment for fractional shares (the “Company Shares,” and together with the cash portion, the “Merger Consideration”). The Company Shares were valued at $296,213 and represent approximately 22.8 percent of the Company’s outstanding common stock immediately following the closing of the merger. The Merger Consideration is subject to customary purchase price adjustments, including working capital, which adjustments are anticipated to be paid in cash.

The cash portion of the Merger Consideration, the repayment of assumed debt, and transaction-related expenses were financed with a $242,300 borrowing under the Credit Agreement which was drawn down on April 1, 2021.

For tax purposes, the transaction is structured partially as a tax-free reorganization and partially as a taxable acquisition, as defined in the Internal Revenue Code. The Company anticipates the amount transferred in a tax deferred manner, under the tax-free reorganization rules, will not create additional tax basis for the Company. The taxable component of the transaction will create additional tax basis and a corresponding future tax deduction for the Company.

The Company is currently evaluating the potential effect of this acquisition on its tax profile. MGP does not expect the transaction to have a material effect on the Company’s estimates related to the use of the Company’s existing deferred tax assets or its estimates related to its existing unrecognized tax benefits based on the information available to date.

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Due to the limited time since the acquisition date and the size and complexity of the transaction, the business combination accounting is still in progress. The Company is currently in the process of finalizing the accounting for this transaction and expects to have preliminary allocation of the purchase consideration to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed by the end of the second quarter of 2021. We expect that this will result in goodwill and intangibles as well as other tangibles assets such as accounts receivable, inventories and property, plant and equipment. The major classes of liabilities assumed include accounts payable, accrued expenses and other long-term liabilities. We are currently in the process of determining the fair values of the acquired assets and assumed liabilities with the assistance of a third party specialist.

During the quarter ended March 31, 2021, the Company has incurred $1,890 of transaction related costs, which are included in Selling, general and administrative expenses on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income.

Note 4. Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

The Company records goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets in connection with various acquisitions of businesses and allocates the goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets to its respective reporting units. Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are included in Other assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Changes in carrying amount of goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets by business segment were as follows:

Distillery Products(a)
Ingredient Solutions
Total (a)
Balance, December 31, 2020
$3,628 $ $3,628 
Acquisitions   
Balance, March 31, 2021
$3,628 $ $3,628 

(a) Includes $890 of trade names at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. Trade names are considered indefinite-lived intangible assets.

Note 5.  Corporate Borrowings

The following table presents the Company’s outstanding indebtedness:
Description(a)
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Credit Agreement - Revolver, 1.12% (variable rate) due 2025
$ $ 
Prudential Note Purchase Agreement, 3.53% (fixed rate) due 2027
20,000 20,000 
Prudential Note Purchase Agreement, 3.80% (fixed rate) due 2029
20,000 20,000 
Total indebtedness outstanding40,000 40,000 
Less unamortized loan fees(b)
(124)(129)
Total indebtedness outstanding, net39,876 39,871 
Less current maturities of long-term debt(2,400)(1,600)
Long-term debt and Credit Agreement - Revolver$37,476 $38,271 

(a) Interest rates are as of March 31, 2021.
(b) Loan fees are being amortized over the life of the Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement.

Credit Agreement. On February 14, 2020, the Company entered into a credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) with multiple participants led by Wells Fargo Bank, National Association (“Wells Fargo Bank”) that matures on February 14, 2025. The Credit Agreement provides for a $300,000 revolving credit facility. The Company may increase the facility from time to time by an aggregate principal amount of up to $100,000 provided certain conditions are satisfied and at the discretion of the lenders. The Credit Agreement includes certain requirements and covenants, which the Company was in compliance with at March 31, 2021. As of March 31, 2021, the Company had no outstanding borrowings under the Credit Agreement leaving $300,000 available.

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Note Purchase Agreements. The Company’s Note Purchase and Private Shelf Agreement (the “Note Purchase Agreement”), as amended by the First Amendment to Private Shelf Agreement as of February 14, 2020 and the Second Amendment to Private Shelf Agreement as of September 30, 2020, with PGIM, Inc., an affiliate of Prudential Financial, Inc., and certain affiliates of PGIM, Inc., provides for the issuance of up to $105,000 of Senior Secured Notes and issuance of $20,000 of Senior Secured Notes. The deadline for issuing the notes under the shelf facility is August 23, 2023. During 2017, the Company issued $20,000 of Senior Secured Notes with a maturity date of August 23, 2027. During 2019, the Company issued $20,000 of additional Senior Secured Notes with a maturity date of April 30, 2029. The Note Purchase Agreement includes certain requirements and covenants, which the Company was in compliance with at March 31, 2021.

Note 6. Income Taxes
The Company’s tax provision for interim periods is determined using an estimated annual effective tax rate, adjusted for discrete items arising in that quarter. In each quarter, the estimated annual effective tax rate is updated and a year to date adjustment is made to the provision. The Company’s quarterly effective tax rate can be subject to significant change due to the effect of discrete items arising in a given quarter.

Income tax expense for the quarter ended March 31, 2021, was $4,615 for an effective tax rate of 23.0 percent. The effective tax rate differed from the 21 percent federal statutory rate on pretax income, primarily due to state taxes, nondeductible transaction costs, partially offset by state and federal tax credits and the deduction applicable to income derived from export activity.

Income tax expense for the quarter ended March 31, 2020, was $3,224 for an effective tax rate of 24.7 percent. The effective tax rate differed from the 21 percent federal statutory rate on pretax income, primarily due to state income taxes, estimated increase in the Company’s valuation allowance related to state income attributes, and the discrete tax impact of vested share-based awards, partially offset by federal and state credits, and the deduction applicable to income derived from export activity.

Note 7.  Equity and EPS

The computations of basic and diluted EPS:
Quarter Ended March 31,
20212020
Operations:
Net income(a)
$15,427 $9,842 
Less: Income attributable to participating securities(b)
146 66 
Net income attributable to common shareholders$15,281 $9,776 
Share information:
Basic and diluted weighted average common shares(c)
16,928,003 17,013,925 
Basic and diluted EPS$0.90 $0.57 

(a)Net income attributable to all shareholders.
(b)Participating securities included 162,496 and 116,127 unvested restricted stock units (“RSUs”), at March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
(c)Under the two-class method, basic and diluted weighted average common shares at March 31, 2021 and 2020 exclude unvested participating securities.

Share Repurchase. On February 25, 2019, MGP’s Board of Directors approved a $25,000 share repurchase authorization commencing February 27, 2019, through February 27, 2022. Under the share repurchase program, the Company can repurchase stock from time to time for cash in open market purchases, block transactions, and privately negotiated transactions in accordance with applicable federal securities laws. This share repurchase program may be modified, suspended, or terminated by the Company at any time without prior notice. The Company did not repurchase any shares during the quarter ended March 31, 2021 and has $20,947 remaining under the share repurchase plan.

During the quarter ended March 31, 2020, the Company repurchased approximately 159,104 shares of MGP Common Stock for $4,053.
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Note 8.  Commitments and Contingencies

There are various legal and regulatory proceedings involving the Company and its subsidiaries.  The Company accrues estimated costs for a contingency when management believes that a loss is probable and can be reasonably estimated.

Feed Dryer Fire. During November 2020, the Company experienced a fire at the Atchison facility. The fire damaged certain equipment in the facility’s feed drying operations and caused temporary loss of production time. During the quarter ended March 31 2021, the Company received a legally binding commitment from their insurance carrier of $8,700 that was recorded as Receivables on the Consolidated Balance Sheet and recorded a $3,610 partial settlement from its insurance carrier as a reduction of Cost of sales. Recorded within Accrued expenses and other on the Consolidated Balance Sheet is $5,090 related to legally committed insurance recovery amounts obtained prior to contingencies related to the insurance claim being resolved. The Company is working to construct a replacement drying system. The Company’s insurance is expected to provide coverage of any business interruption and other losses from damage to property, plant and equipment, but there can be no assurance to the amount or timing of possible insurance recoveries if ultimately claimed by the Company.

Ransomware Cyber-Attack. In May 2020, the Company was affected by a ransomware cyber-attack that temporarily disrupted production at its Atchison facilities. The Company’s financial information was not affected and there is no evidence that any sensitive or confidential company, supplier, customer or employee data was improperly accessed or extracted from our network. The Company has insurance related to this event and currently evaluating if it will seek further recovery. Following the attack, MGP implemented a variety of measures to further enhance our cybersecurity protections and minimize the impact of any future attack. The Company’s insurance may cover additional losses from this incident, but there can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of any possible insurance recoveries if ultimately claimed by the Company.

Shareholder matters. In 2020, two putative class action lawsuits were filed in the United States District Court for District of Kansas, naming the Company and certain of its current and former executive officers as defendants, asserting claims under Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The plaintiffs seek to pursue claims on behalf of a class consisting of purchasers or acquirers of the Company’s Common Stock during certain specified periods (the “Class Periods”). On May 28, 2020, the two lawsuits were consolidated and the Court appointed City of Miami Fire Fighters’ and Police Officers’ Retirement Trust as lead plaintiff. The consolidated action is captioned In re MGP Ingredients, Inc. Securities Litigation and the file is maintained under Master File No. 2:20-cv-2090-DDCJPO. On July 22, 2020, the Retirement Trust filed a consolidated Amended Complaint. The Consolidated Complaint alleges that the defendants made false and/or misleading statements regarding the Company’s forecasts of sales of aged whiskey, and that, as a result the Company’s Common Stock traded at artificially inflated prices throughout the Class Periods. The plaintiffs seek compensatory damages, interest, attorneys’ fees, costs, and unspecified equitable relief, but have not specified the amount of damages being sought. On September 8, 2020, defendants filed a Motion to Dismiss the Consolidated Amended Complaint. The Motion has been fully briefed and remains pending. Discovery is stayed while the motion is pending. The Company intends to continue to vigorously defend itself in this action.

On May 11, 2020, Mitchell Dorfman, a shareholder in MGP, filed an action in the United States District Court for the District of Kansas, under the caption Dorfman, derivatively on behalf of MGP Ingredients v. Griffin, et al., Case 2:20-cv-02239. On June 4, 2020, Justin Carter, a shareholder in MGP, filed an action in the United States District Court for the District of Kansas, under the caption Carter, derivatively on behalf of MGP Ingredients v. Griffin, et al., Case 2:20-cv-02281. On June 18, 2020, Alexandra Kearns, a shareholder in MGP, filed an action in the District Court of Atchison County, Kansas, under the caption Kearns, derivatively on behalf of MGP Ingredients v. Griffin, et al., Case 2020-CV-000042. The defendants are certain of the Company’s current and former officers and directors. The Company is a nominal defendant in each action. Plaintiffs allege that the Company was damaged as a result of the conduct of the individual defendants alleged in the MGP Ingredients, Inc. Securities Litigation, the repurchase of company stock at artificially inflated prices, and compensation paid to the individual defendants. The Complaint in Dorfman asserts claims for violations of Sections 14(a), 10(b), and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, breach of fiduciary duties, waste of corporate assets, and unjust enrichment. The Complaint in Carter asserts claims for violations of Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, breach of fiduciary duties, waste of corporate assets, and unjust enrichment. The Petition in Kearns asserts claims for breach of fiduciary duties, waste of corporate assets, and unjust enrichment. The pleadings pray for an award of compensatory damages, including interest, in favor of the Company, for equitable relief related to the Company’s corporate governance, for disgorgement of compensation, and for an award of attorneys’ fees and costs. On July 13, 2020, defendants filed a Motion to Dismiss in Dorfman. On August 13, 2020, defendants filed a Motion to Stay the Kearns action pending the resolution of Dorfman. On November 3, 2020, the court entered an order providing that Defendants’ response to the Carter Complaint shall be due 14 days after a ruling on the Motion to Dismiss filed in Dorfman.

On March 31, 2021, the Dorfman court issued a Memorandum and Order in which it granted defendants’ Motion to Dismiss plaintiff’s federal claims, dismissed those claims without prejudice, denied without prejudice defendants’ Motion to Dismiss
14


plaintiff’s state claims, and stayed the case pending the Kansas Supreme Court’s decision in Herington v. City of Wichita. Herington involves the issue of whether a federal decision that determines federal claims and dismisses pendent state law claims for lack of supplemental jurisdiction precludes the reassertion of the state law claims in state court. The Kearns court has not yet taken any action in response to the court’s Memorandum and Order in Dorfman. On April 14, 2021, defendants in Carter filed a Motion to dismiss plaintiff’s federal claims and to stay plaintiff’s state claims until fourteen days after the Court rules on the state claims in Dorfman.

On November 25, 2020, Kenneth Laury filed an action in the District Court of Shawnee County, Kansas under the caption Laury v. MGP Ingredients., Case Number: 2020-CV-000609. The Petition alleges that plaintiff commenced the action under K.S.A. 17-6510 to enforce his alleged right to inspect books and records of the Company, in order to enable him to evaluate possible misconduct by the Company’s Board of Directors and management. On January 8, 2021, the Company filed an answer to the Petition, denying that plaintiff has satisfied the statutory requirements for his demand. On February 25, 2021 and March 15, 2021, the court entered Orders under which discovery is to close on May 14, 2021 and a pretrial conference is scheduled for May 18, 2021.

2016 Atchison Chemical Release. A chemical release occurred at the Company’s Atchison facility on October 21, 2016, which resulted in emissions venting into the air (“the Atchison Chemical Release”). Private plaintiffs have also initiated, and additional private plaintiffs may initiate, legal proceedings for damages resulting from the Atchison Chemical Release, but the Company is currently unable to reasonably estimate the amount of any such damages that might result. The Company’s insurance is expected to provide coverage of any damages to private plaintiffs, subject to a deductible of $250, but certain regulatory fines or penalties may not be covered and there can be no assurance to the amount or timing of possible insurance recoveries if ultimately claimed by the Company.

Note 9.  Employee and Non-Employee Benefit Plans

Equity-Based Compensation Plans.  The Company’s equity-based compensation plans provide for the awarding of stock options, stock appreciation rights, shares of restricted stock (“Restricted Stock”), and RSUs for senior executives and salaried employees, as well as non-employee directors. The Company has two active equity-based compensation plans: the Employee Equity Incentive Plan of 2014 (the “2014 Plan”) and the Non-Employee Director Equity Incentive Plan (the “Directors’ Plan”).

As of March 31, 2021, 507,549 RSUs had been granted of the 1,500,000 shares approved under the 2014 Plan, and 110,505 shares had been granted of the 300,000 shares approved under the Directors’ Plan. As of March 31, 2021, there were 170,336 unvested RSUs under the Company’s long-term incentive plans and 162,496 were participating securities (Note 7).

Deferred Compensation Plan. The Company established an unfunded Executive Deferred Compensation Plan (“EDC Plan”) effective as of June 30, 2018, with a purpose to attract and retain highly-compensated key employees by providing participants with an opportunity to defer receipt of a portion of their salary, bonus, and other specified compensation. The Company’s obligations under this plan will change in conjunction with the performance of the participants’ investments, along with contributions to and withdrawals from the plan. Realized and unrealized gains (losses) on deferred compensation plan investments were included as a component of Interest expense, net and other on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income for the quarter ended March 31, 2021. For quarter ended March 31, 2021, the Company had a gain on deferred compensation plan investments of $30. For quarter ended March 31, 2020, the Company had a loss on deferred compensation plan investments of $164.

Plan investments are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy since the investments trade with sufficient frequency and volume to enable the Company to obtain pricing information on an ongoing basis. Participants were able to direct the deferral of a portion of their base salary and a portion of their estimated accrued Short-term incentive plan (“STI Plan”) amounts that were paid during first quarter of the following year. Base salary amounts elected for deferral are deposited into the EDC Plan by the Company on a weekly basis and allocated by participants among Company-determined investment options. STI plan deferral were deposited, at the time of payment, into the EDC Plan by the Company and allocated by participants among Company-determined investment options.

At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the EDC Plan investments were $3,299 and $2,007, respectively, which were recorded in Other assets on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The EDC Plan current liabilities were $483 at March 31, 2021 and were included in Accrued expenses and other on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. The EDC Plan non-current liabilities were $2,890 and $3,140 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, and were included in Other noncurrent liabilities on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

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Note 10.  Operating Segments

At March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company had two segments: Distillery Products and Ingredient Solutions. The Distillery Products segment consists of food grade alcohol and distillery co-products, such as distillers feed (commonly called dried distillers grain in the industry) and fuel grade alcohol. The Distillery Products segment also includes warehouse services, including barrel put away, storage, retrieval, and blending services. Ingredient Solutions segment consists of specialty starches and proteins and commodity starches and proteins.

Operating profit for each segment is based on sales less identifiable operating expenses.  Non-direct selling, general and administrative expenses, interest expense, other special charges, and other general miscellaneous expenses are excluded from segment operations and are classified as Corporate.  Receivables, inventories, and equipment have been identified with the segments to which they relate.  All other assets are considered as Corporate.

Quarter Ended March 31,
20212020
Sales to Customers
Distillery Products$89,194 $80,002 
Ingredient Solutions19,129 19,080 
Total$108,323 $99,082 
Gross Profit
Distillery Products$28,331 $18,249 
Ingredient Solutions3,968 4,962 
Total$32,299 $23,211 
Depreciation and Amortization
Distillery Products$2,583 $2,401 
Ingredient Solutions475 453 
Corporate253 271 
Total$3,311 $3,125 
Income (loss) before Income Taxes
Distillery Products$25,639 $16,233 
Ingredient Solutions3,172 4,214 
Corporate(8,769)(7,381)
Total$20,042 $13,066 

The following table allocates assets to each segment as of:
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Identifiable Assets
Distillery Products$302,622 $288,069 
Ingredient Solutions39,093 41,276 
Corporate39,387 37,230 
Total$381,102 $366,575 

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Note 11.  Subsequent Events

Business Combination. On April 1, 2021, the Company completed the acquisition of Luxco. Luxco is a leading branded beverage alcohol company across various categories. See Note 3, Business Acquisition for further details.

As a result of the acquisition of Luxco, the Company will report the Luxco brands in a new reporting segment: Branded Spirits. Beginning in the second quarter 2021, the Company will report three operating segments; Distillery Products, Branded Spirits and Ingredient Solutions.

Dividend. On May 3, 2021, the Company’s Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend payable to stockholders of record as of May 21, 2021, of the Company’s Common Stock, and a dividend equivalent payable to holders of certain RSUs as of May 21, 2021, of $0.12 per share and per unit, payable on June 4, 2021.


ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
(Dollar amounts in thousands, unless otherwise noted)

CAUTIONARY NOTE CONCERNING FACTORS THAT MAY AFFECT FUTURE RESULTS

This Report on Form 10-Q contains forward looking statements as well as historical information.  All statements, other than statements of historical facts, regarding the prospects of our industry and our prospects, plans, financial position, and strategic plan may constitute forward looking statements.  In addition, forward looking statements are usually identified by or are associated with such words as “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “hopeful,” “should,” “may,” “will,” “could,” “encouraged,” “opportunities,” “potential,” and/or the negatives or variations of these terms or similar terminology.  Forward looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward looking statements. A detailed discussion of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results and events to differ materially from such forward looking statements is included in the section titled “Risk Factors” (Item 1A) of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 and Part II, Item 1A of this report Form 10Q. Forward looking statements are made as of the date of this report, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward looking statements, whether because of new information, future events or otherwise.

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
Acquisition of Luxco. On January 22, 2021, we entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Luxco, Inc. and its affiliated companies (“Luxco”, or “Luxco Companies”), and subsequently completed the merger on April 1, 2021. Luxco is a leading branded beverage alcohol company across various categories, with a more than 60-year business heritage. As a result of the acquisition of Luxco, we expect to increase our scale and market position in the branded-spirits sector and strengthen our platform for future growth of higher valued-added products. Following the merger, the Luxco Companies became wholly-owned subsidiaries of MGP. The aggregate consideration we paid in connection with the merger was $237,500 in cash (less assumed indebtedness) and 5,007,833 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $296,213, subject to adjustment for fractional shares. (Note 3, Business Acquisition for additional information).

Feed Dryer Fire. During November 2020, we experienced a fire at the Atchison facility. The fire damaged certain equipment in the facility’s feed drying operations and caused temporary loss of production time. During the quarter ended March 31 2021, we recorded a $3,610 partial settlement from our insurance carrier as a reduction of Cost of sales. We are working to construct a replacement drying system. Our insurance is expected to provide coverage of any business interruption and other losses from damage to property, plant and equipment, but there can be no assurance to the amount or timing of possible insurance recoveries if ultimately claimed by the Company.

COVID-19. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, we are monitoring the guidance from federal, state and local public health authorities and will take the necessary actions to comply with the updated guidelines. The Company’s business is part of the United States’ critical infrastructure and thus is deemed to be an “essential business.” As such, we continue to take the necessary and appropriate actions to protect our workforce as it continues its critical operations. We have continued to operate without any significant negative impacts; however this could be effected by voluntary or mandatory temporary closures of our facilities, interruptions to our supply chain or additional efforts to protect the health and safety of our employees.

As of the date of this report, the Company’s operations, supply chain and customer demand have not been significantly affected
17


by COVID-19; however, we are monitoring the situation closely. The Company cannot reasonably estimate the length of time or severity of the pandemic and cannot estimate the impact this pandemic will have on our consolidated financial results for 2021.

OVERVIEW

MGP is a leading producer and supplier of premium distilled spirits and specialty wheat protein and starch food ingredients. Distilled spirits include premium bourbon and rye whiskeys and grain neutral spirits (“GNS”), including vodka and gin. We are also a top producer of high quality industrial alcohol for use in both food and non-food applications. Our protein and starch food ingredients provide a host of functional, nutritional and sensory benefits for a wide range of food products to serve the packaged goods industry.

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in this Form 10-Q, as well as our audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes and Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - General, set forth in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Consolidated results

The table below details the consolidated results for the quarters ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:
Quarter Ended March 31,
202120202021 v. 2020
Sales$108,323 $99,082 9.3 %
Cost of sales76,024 75,871 0.2 
Gross profit32,299 23,211 39.2 
   Gross margin %29.8 %23.4 %6.4 
pp(a)
Selling, general, and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses11,799 9,503 24.2 
Operating income20,500 13,708 49.6 
   Operating margin %18.9 %13.8 %5.1 pp
Interest expense, net and other(458)(642)28.7 
Income before income taxes20,042 13,066 53.4 
Income tax expense4,615 3,224 43.1 
   Effective tax expense rate %23.0 %24.7 %(1.7)pp
Net income$15,427 $9,842 56.7 %
   Net income margin %14.2 %9.9 %4.3 pp
(a) Percentage points (“pp”).

Sales - Sales for quarter ended March 31, 2021 were $108,323, an increase of 9.3 percent compared to the year-ago quarter, which was the result of increased sales in both the Distillery Products and Ingredient Solutions segments. Within the Distillery Products segment, sales were up 11.5 percent, primarily due to an increase in the sales of brown goods within premium beverage alcohol. Within the Ingredient Solutions segment, sales were up 0.3 percent, primarily due to increased sales of commodity wheat starches, partially offset by specialty wheat proteins (see Segment Results).

Gross profit - Gross profit for quarter ended March 31, 2021 was $32,299, an increase of 39.2 percent compared to the year-ago quarter. The increase was driven by an increase in gross profit in Distillery Products segment, partially offset by a decrease in gross profit in the Ingredient Solutions segment. In the Distillery Products segment, gross profit increased by $10,082, or 55.2 percent. In the Ingredient Solutions segment, gross profit decreased by $994, or 20.0 percent (see Segment Results).

SG&A expenses - SG&A expenses for quarter ended March 31, 2021 were $11,799, an increase of 24.2 percent compared to the year-ago quarter. The increase in SG&A was primarily due to Luxco acquisition related costs.

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Operating income - Operating income for quarter ended March 31, 2021 increased to $20,500 from $13,708 for quarter ended March 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase in gross profit in the Distillery Products segment, partially offset by the increase in the previously described SG&A expenses and decrease in gross profit in the Ingredient Solutions segment.

Operating income, quarter versus quarterOperating Income Change
Operating income for quarter ended March 31, 2020
$13,708 
Increase in gross profit - Distillery Products segment(a)
10,082 73.6 
pp(b)
Decrease in gross profit - Ingredient Solutions segment(a)
(994)(7.3)pp
Increase in SG&A expenses
(2,296)(16.7)pp
Operating income for quarter ended March 31, 2021
$20,500 49.6 %

(a) See segment discussion.
(b) Percentage points (“pp”).

Income tax expense - Income tax expense for quarter ended March 31, 2021 was $4,615, for an effective tax rate of 23.0 percent. Income tax expense for the quarter ended March 31, 2020, was $3,224, for an effective tax rate of 24.7 percent. The increase in Income tax expense, quarter versus quarter, was primarily due to an increase in Income before income taxes. The effective tax rate decreased, quarter versus quarter, primarily due to additional tax credits recognized as a result of the new drying system investment.

Earnings per share (“EPS”) - EPS was $0.90 for quarter ended March 31, 2021, compared to $0.57 for quarter ended March 31, 2020. The change in EPS, quarter versus quarter, was primarily due to an increase in Operating income, and by a change in effective tax rate as previously described.

Change in basic and diluted EPS, quarter versus quarterBasic and Diluted EPSChange
Basic and diluted EPS for quarter ended March 31, 2020
$0.57 
Increase in operations(a)
0.30 52.6 
pp(b)
Tax: Change in effective tax rate0.02 3.5 pp
Decrease in weighted average shares outstanding
0.01 1.8 pp
Basic and diluted EPS for quarter ended March 31, 2021
$0.90 57.9 %
(a) Item is net of tax based on the effective tax rate for the base year (2020).
(b) Percentage points (“pp”).



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SEGMENT RESULTS

Distillery Products

The following tables show selected financial information for the Distillery Products segment for the quarters ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

DISTILLERY PRODUCTS SALES
Quarter Ended March 31,Quarter versus Quarter Sales Change Increase/(Decrease)
20212020$ Change% Change
Brown goods$43,415 $29,070 $14,345 49.3 %
White goods16,853 16,902 (49)(0.3)
Premium beverage alcohol60,268 45,972 14,296 31.1 
Industrial alcohol17,336 21,618 (4,282)(19.8)
Food grade alcohol77,604 67,590 10,014 14.8 
Fuel grade alcohol2,517 1,522 995 65.4 
Distillers feed and related co-products4,972 6,989 (2,017)(28.9)
Warehouse services4,101 3,901 200 5.1 
Total Distillery Products$89,194 $80,002 $9,192 11.5 %
Change in Quarter versus Quarter Sales Attributed to:
Total (a)
Volume(b)
Net Price/Mix(c)
Premium beverage alcohol31.1%24.7%6.4%
Other Financial Information
Quarter Ended March 31,Quarter versus Quarter Increase / (Decrease)
20212020$ Change% Change
Gross profit$28,331 $18,249 $10,082 55.2 %
Gross margin %31.8 %22.8 %9.0 
pp(d)
(a) Total sales change is calculated by taking the difference between current period sales dollars and prior period sales dollars, divided by prior period sales dollars.
(b) Volume change is calculated by taking the difference between current period sales volume and prior period sales volume, multiplied by prior period sales per unit
(c) Price/Mix change is calculated by taking the difference between current period sales-per-unit and prior period sales-per unit, multiplied by current period sales volume.
(d) Percentage points (“pp”).

Total sales of Distillery Products for the quarter ended March 31, 2021 increased by $9,192, or 11.5 percent, compared to the prior year quarter. Sales of brown goods within premium beverage alcohol, fuel grade alcohol and warehouse services increased while industrial alcohol, distillers feed and related co-products, and white goods within premium beverage alcohol decreased compared to the prior year quarter. The increase in sales of brown goods and fuel grade alcohol was driven by higher sales volume and higher average selling price. These increases were offset by a decrease in sales of industrial alcohol which was driven by lower sales volume due to the discontinuing of the ICP third party sales and marketing services, partially offset by higher average selling price. The decrease in sales of distillers feed and related co-products was due to lower average selling price, partially offset by higher sales volume both of which are results of the Dryer Fire Incident (see Note 8, Commitments and Contingencies for further details).

Gross profit increased quarter versus quarter by $10,082, or 55.2 percent. Gross margin for the quarter ended March 31, 2021 increased to 31.8 percent from 22.8 percent for the prior year quarter. The increase in gross profit was primarily due to higher sales volume on brown goods as well as higher average selling price on industrial alcohol. The increase in gross profit was partially offset by higher input costs of brown and white goods.


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Ingredient Solutions

The following tables show selected financial information for the Ingredient Solutions segment for the quarter ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

INGREDIENT SOLUTIONS SALES
Quarter Ended March 31,Quarter versus Quarter Sales Change Increase / (Decrease)
20212020$ Change% Change
Specialty wheat starches$10,222 $10,212 $10 0.1 %
Specialty wheat proteins6,046 6,365 (319)(5.0)
Commodity wheat starches2,283 1,877 406 21.6 
Commodity wheat proteins578 626 (48)(7.7)
Total Ingredient Solutions$19,129 $19,080 $49 0.3 %
Change in Quarter versus Quarter Sales Attributed to:
Total(a)
Volume(b)
Net Price/Mix(c)
Total Ingredient Solutions0.3%(0.1)%0.4%
Other Financial Information
Quarter Ended March 31,Quarter versus Quarter Increase / (Decrease)
20212020$ Change% Change
Gross profit$3,968 $4,962 $(994)(20.0)%
Gross margin %20.7 %26.0 %(5.3)
pp(d)

(a) Total sales change is calculated by taking the difference between current period sales dollars and prior period sales dollars, divided by prior period sales dollars.
(b) Volume change is calculated by taking the difference between current period sales volume and prior period sales volume, multiplied by prior period sales per unit
(c) Price/Mix change is calculated by taking the difference between current period sales-per-unit and prior period sales-per unit, multiplied by current period sales volume.
(d) Percentage points (“pp”).

Total Ingredient Solutions sales for quarter ended March 31, 2021 increased by $49, or 0.3 percent, compared to the prior year quarter. Quarter versus quarter, this increase was driven by higher sales of commodity wheat starches, partially offset by decreased sales of specialty wheat proteins. The increase in sales of commodity wheat starches, which entered the quarter with higher relative inventory, was primarily driven by increased sales volume. These increases were partially offset by decreased sales volume of specialty wheat proteins, partially offset by higher average selling price.
Gross profit decreased quarter versus quarter by $994, or 20.0 percent. Gross margin for the quarter ended March 31, 2021 decreased to 20.7 percent from 26.0 percent for the prior year quarter. The decrease in gross profit was primarily driven by the temporary curtailment of natural gas usage due to extreme weather conditions which caused the Company to shut down the Atchison facilities for several days.





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CASH FLOW, FINANCIAL CONDITION AND LIQUIDITY

We believe our financial condition continues to be of high quality, as evidenced by our ability to generate adequate cash from operations while having ready access to capital at competitive rates.

Operating cash flow and debt through our Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement (Note 5) provide the primary sources of cash to fund operating needs and capital expenditures. These same sources of cash are used to fund shareholder dividends and other discretionary uses. Our overall liquidity reflects our strong business results and an effective cash management strategy that takes into account liquidity management, economic factors, and tax considerations. We expect our sources of cash, including our Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement, to be adequate to provide for budgeted capital expenditures and anticipated operating requirements for the foreseeable future.

Cash Flow Summary
Quarter Ended March 31,Changes, quarter versus quarter Increase / (Decrease)
20212020
Cash provided by operating activities $16,990 $542 $16,448 
Cash used in investing activities (13,340)(8,189)(5,151)
Cash (used in) provided by financing activities (2,726)46,997 (49,723)
Increase in cash and cash equivalents$924 $39,350 $(38,426)

Cash increased $924 for quarter ended March 31, 2021, compared to an increase of $39,350 for quarter ended March 31, 2020, for a net decrease in cash of $38,426, period versus period.

Operating Activities. Cash provided by operating activities for quarter ended March 31, 2021 was $16,990. The cash provided by operating activities during quarter ended March 31, 2021 resulted primarily from net income of $15,427, adjustments for non-cash or non-operating charges of $5,892 including, depreciation and amortization, and share-based compensation, partially offset by uses of cash due to changes in operating assets and liabilities of $4,329. The primary drivers of the changes in operating assets and liabilities were $8,385 use of cash related to a decrease in accrued expenses and other primarily related to incentive compensation expenses, $4,348 use of cash related to an increase in accounts receivables, net due to increased sales during the quarter as well as an increase in insurance recoveries receivable, and $1,084 use of cash related to an increase in prepaid expenses due to an increase in prepaid insurance. These uses of cash were partially offset by $5,237 cash provided by an increase in income taxes payable and $4,924 related to a decrease in inventories, primarily barreled distillate.

Cash provided by operating activities for quarter ended March 31, 2020 was $542. The cash provided by operating activities during quarter ended March 31, 2020 resulted primarily from net income of $9,842, adjustments for non-cash or non-operating charges of $4,356, including depreciation and amortization and share-based compensation, partially offset by uses of cash due to changes in operating assets and liabilities of $13,656. The primary drivers of the changes in operating assets and liabilities were $11,453 use of cash related to an increase in receivables, net due to timing of customer payments as well as increased sales during the quarter, $5,649 use of cash related to an increase in inventories, primarily barreled distillate, and $2,339 use of cash related to an increase in prepaid expenses. These uses of cash were partially offset by $3,100 cash provided by income taxes payable (refundable) and $1,635 cash provided by accounts payable related to timing of cash disbursements.

Investing Activities. Cash used in investing activities for quarter ended March 31, 2021 was $13,340, which resulted from additions to property, plant and equipment of $12,059 (see Capital Spending). Cash used in investing activities for quarter ended March 31, 2020 was $8,189, which resulted from additions to property, plant and equipment of $5,645 (see Capital Spending) and an increase related to the acquisition of a business of $2,750, partially offset by proceeds from sale of property of $366.

Capital Spending. We manage capital spending to support our business growth plans. Investments in property, plant and equipment were $12,059 and $5,645 for quarter ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Adjusted for the change in capital expenditures in accounts payable for quarter ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, of $(2,238) and $(2,690), respectively, total capital expenditures were $9,821 and $2,955, respectively.

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We expect approximately $43,300 in capital expenditures in 2021, excluding any insurance recoveries. Of the $43,300 expected capital expenditures $29,400 is allocated for the replacement of the feed dryer system. The remainder is for facility improvement and expansion, facility sustenance projects, and environmental health and safety projects.

Financing Activities. Cash used in financing activities for quarter ended March 31, 2021 was $2,726, due to payments of dividends and dividend equivalents of $2,052 (see Dividends and Dividend Equivalents) and purchases of treasury stock of $674 (see Treasury Purchases and Share Repurchases).

Cash provided financing activities for quarter ended March 31, 2020 was $46,997, primarily due to net proceeds from debt of $54,600 (See Long-Term and Short-Term Debt), offset by purchases of treasury stock of $4,395 (see Treasury Purchases and Share Repurchases) and payments of dividends and dividend equivalents of $2,060 (see Dividends and Dividend Equivalents).

Treasury Purchases. 33,829 RSUs vested and converted to common shares for employees during quarter ended March 31, 2021, of which we withheld and purchased for treasury 10,376 shares valued at $674 to cover payment of associated withholding taxes.

30,388 RSUs vested and converted to common shares for employees during quarter ended March 31, 2020, of which we withheld and purchased for treasury 10,044 shares valued at $342 to cover payment of associated withholding taxes.

Share Repurchases. On February 25, 2019, our Board of Directors approved a $25,000 share repurchase authorization commencing February 27, 2019, through February 27, 2022. Under the share repurchase program, we can repurchase stock from time to time for cash in open market purchases, block transactions, and privately negotiated transactions in accordance with applicable federal securities laws. This share repurchase program may be modified, suspended, or terminated by us at any time without prior notice. The Company did not repurchase any shares during the quarter ended March 31, 2021 and has $20,947 remaining under the share repurchase plan.

During the quarter ended March 31, 2020, we repurchased approximately 159,104 shares of MGP Common Stock for $4,053.

Dividends and Dividend Equivalents

Dividend and Dividend Equivalent Information (per Share and Unit)
Declaration dateRecord datePayment dateDeclaredPaidDividend payment
Dividend equivalent payment(a)(b)
Total payment(b)
2021 
February 23, 2021March 12, 2021March 26, 2021$0.12 $0.12 $2,033 $19 $2,052 
2020
February 24, 2020March 13, 2020March 27, 2020$0.12 $0.12 $2,047 $13 $2,060 
(a) Dividend equivalent payments on unvested participating securities.
(b) Includes estimated forfeitures.

On May 3, 2021, our Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend payable to stockholders of record as of May 21, 2021, of the Company’s Common Stock, and a dividend equivalent payable to holders of certain RSUs as of May 21, 2021, of $0.12 per share and per unit, payable on June 4, 2021.

Long-Term and Short-Term Debt. We maintain debt levels we consider appropriate after evaluating a number of factors, including cash flow expectations, cash requirements for ongoing operations, investment and financing plans (including brand development and share repurchase activities) and the overall cost of capital. Total debt was $39,876 (net of unamortized loan fees of $124) at March 31, 2021, and $39,871 (net of unamortized loan fees of $129) at December 31, 2020.

Financial Condition and Liquidity. Our principal uses of cash in the ordinary course of business are for input costs used in our production processes, salaries, capital expenditures, and investments supporting our strategic plan, such as the aging of barreled distillate.  Generally, during periods when commodities prices are rising, our operations require increased use of cash to support inventory levels.

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Our principal sources of cash are product sales and borrowing on our Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement. Under our Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement, we must meet certain financial covenants and restrictions, and at March 31, 2021, we met those covenants and restrictions.

At March 31, 2021, our current assets exceeded our current liabilities by $174,545, largely due to our inventories, at cost, of $136,087. At March 31, 2021, our cash balance was $22,586 and we have used our Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement for liquidity purposes, with $300,000 remaining for additional borrowings. We anticipate being able to support our short-term liquidity and operating needs largely through cash generated from operations. We regularly assess our cash needs and the available sources to fund these needs. While we currently believe we are well positioned with our credit agreement, we will continue to monitor the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our operations and liquidity needs. We utilize short-term and long-term debt to fund discretionary items, such as capital investments and dividend payments. In addition, we have strong operating results such that financial institutions should provide sufficient credit funding to meet short-term financing requirements, if needed.

On April 1, 2021, the Company completed the merger with Luxco. The aggregate consideration paid by the Company in connection with the merger was $237,500 in cash (less assumed indebtedness) and 5,007,833 shares of common stock of the Company, subject to adjustment for fractional shares (the “Company Shares,” and together with the cash portion, the “Merger Consideration”). The Merger Consideration is subject to customary purchase price adjustments, including working capital, which adjustments are anticipated to be paid in cash. The cash portion of the Merger Consideration, the repayment of assumed debt and transaction-related expenses were financed with a $242,300 borrowing under the Credit Agreement. We anticipate having sufficient cash flows to support our short-term liquidity and operating needs.

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

We are exposed to commodity price and interest rate market risks. We monitor and manage these exposures as part of our overall risk management program. Our risk management program focuses on the unpredictability of financial markets and seeks to reduce the potentially adverse effects that the volatility of these markets may have on our operating results.

Commodity Costs. Certain commodities we use in our production process, or input costs, expose us to market price risk due to volatility in the prices for those commodities.  Through our grain supply contracts for our Atchison and Lawrenceburg facilities, our wheat flour supply contract for our Atchison facility, and our natural gas contracts for both facilities, we purchase grain, wheat flour, and natural gas, respectively, for delivery from one to 24 months into the future at negotiated prices.  We have determined that the firm commitments to purchase grain, wheat flour, and natural gas under the terms of our supply contracts meet the normal purchases and sales exception as defined under Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 815,  Derivatives and Hedging, because the quantities involved are for amounts to be consumed within the normal expected production process.

Interest Rate Exposures. Our Credit Agreement and Note Purchase Agreement (Note 5) expose us to market risks arising from adverse changes in interest rates. Established procedures and internal processes govern the management of this market risk.

Increases in market interest rates would cause interest expense to increase and earnings before income taxes to decrease. The change in interest expense and earnings before income taxes would be dependent upon the weighted average outstanding borrowings during the reporting period following an increase in market interest rates. Based on weighted average outstanding variable-rate borrowings at March 31, 2021, a 100 basis point increase over the non-default rates actually in effect at such date would have no impact our interest expense on an annualized basis. Based on weighted average outstanding fixed-rate borrowings at March 31, 2021, a 100 basis point increase in market rates would result in a decrease in the fair value of our outstanding fixed-rate debt of $1,543, and a 100 basis point decrease in market rates would result in an increase in the fair value of our outstanding fixed-rate debt of $1,626.

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ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures. As of the quarter ended March 31, 2021, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have each reviewed and evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act). Based on that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have each concluded that our current disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission rules and forms, and include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in such reports is accumulated and communicated to our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
  
Changes in Internal Controls. There were no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting during the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Reference is made to Part I, Item 3, Legal Proceedings of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, and Note 8 to this Report on Form 10-Q for information on certain proceedings to which we are subject.


ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS

Risk factors are described in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. The following amends and restates the Company’s risk factors in connection with the completion of a material acquisition.
RISKS THAT AFFECT OUR BUSINESS AS A WHOLE
An interruption of operations or a catastrophic event at our facilities could negatively affect our business.

Although we maintain insurance coverage for various property damage and loss events, an interruption in or loss of operations at any of our production facilities could reduce or postpone production of our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, or financial condition. To the extent that our value added products rely on unique or proprietary processes or techniques, replacing lost production by purchasing from outside suppliers would be difficult.

In November 2020 a dryer at our Atchison facility was destroyed in a fire, resulting in an interruption in operations at our Atchison facility. We had significant property damage. The Company’s insurance has provided and is expected to provide coverage for property damage and business interruption losses, but there can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of possible insurance recoveries if ultimately claimed by the Company.

Our customers store a substantial amount of barreled inventory of aged premium bourbon and rye whiskeys at our Lawrenceburg facility and our nearby warehouses in Williamstown, Kentucky and Sunman, Indiana. If a catastrophic event were to occur at our Lawrenceburg facility or our warehouses, our customers' business could be adversely affected. The loss of a significant amount of aged inventory through fire, natural disaster, or otherwise could result in customer claims against us, liability for customer losses, and a reduction of warehouse services revenue.

We also store a substantial amount of our own inventory of aged premium bourbon and rye whiskeys at our Lawrenceburg facility and our nearby warehouses, at our LuxRow facility in Bardstown, KY, and at the facilities of certain third party producers. If a catastrophic event were to occur at any of these locations, our business, financial condition, or results of operations could be adversely affected. The loss of a significant amount of our aged inventory through fire, natural disaster, or otherwise, could result in a reduction in supply of the affected product or products and could affect our long-term growth.

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A disruption in transportation services could negatively affect our business.

A disruption in transportation services could result in difficulties supplying materials to our facilities and impact our ability to deliver products to our customers in a timely manner, and our business, financial condition, or results of operations could be adversely affected.

Our profitability is affected by the costs of grain, wheat flour, agave, and natural gas, or input costs, that we use in our business, the availability and costs of which are subject to weather and other factors beyond our control. We may not be able to recover the costs of commodities and energy by increasing our selling prices.

Grain and wheat flour costs are a significant portion of our costs of goods sold. Historically, the cost of such raw materials has, at times, been subject to substantial fluctuation, depending upon a number of factors which affect commodity prices in general and over which we have no control. These include crop conditions, weather, disease, plantings, government programs and policies, competition for acquisition of inputs such as agricultural commodities, purchases by foreign governments, and changes in demand resulting from population growth and customer preferences. Agave is a key ingredient in the production of tequila and is not a traded commodity. Prices for agave are set by independent farmers in specified regions of Mexico, and therefore are subject to fluctuation depending on factors outside of our control. The price of natural gas also fluctuates based on anticipated changes in supply and demand, weather, and the prices of alternative fuels. Fluctuations in the price of commodities and natural gas can be sudden and volatile at times and have had, from time to time, significant adverse effects on the results of our operations. Higher energy costs could result in higher transportation costs and other operating costs.
We do not enter into futures and options contracts ourselves because we can purchase grain and wheat flour for delivery into the future under our grain and wheat flour supply agreements. We intend to contract for the future delivery of grain and wheat flour only to protect margins on expected sales. On the portion of volume not contracted, we attempt to recover higher commodity costs through higher selling prices, but market considerations may not always permit this result. Even where prices can be adjusted, there is likely a lag between when we experience higher commodity or natural gas costs and when we might be able to increase prices. To the extent we are unable to timely pass increases in the cost of raw materials to our customers under sales contracts, market fluctuations in the cost of grain, agave, natural gas, and ethanol may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

We have a high concentration of certain raw material and finished goods purchases from a limited number of suppliers which exposes us to risk.

We have signed supply agreements with Bunge and CGB for our grain supply (primarily corn) and with Ardent Mills for our wheat flour. The Company also procures some textured wheat proteins through a third-party toll manufacturer in the United States. Additionally, the Company procures barrels, glass, and bottle closures from third-party vendors. If any of these companies encounters an operational or financial issue, or otherwise cannot meet our supply demands, it could lead to an interruption in supply to us and/or higher prices than those we have negotiated or than are available in the market at the time, and in turn, have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

The markets for our products are very competitive, and our business could be negatively affected if we do not compete effectively.

The markets for products in which we participate are very competitive. Our principal competitors in these markets have substantial financial, marketing, and other resources, and several are much larger enterprises than us. Many of our current and potential competitors have larger customer bases, greater name recognition and broader product offerings. In recent years, the global beverage alcohol industry has continued to experience consolidation. Industry consolidation can have varying degrees of impact, including the creation of new and larger competitors. We are dependent on being able to generate sales and other operating income in excess of the costs of products sold in order to obtain margins, profits, and cash flows to meet or exceed our targeted financial performance measures. Competition is based on such factors as product innovation, product characteristics, product taste and quality, pricing, color, and name and brand image.

Pricing of our products is partly dependent upon industry capacity, which is impacted by competitor actions to bring online idled capacity or to build new production capacity. If market conditions make our products too expensive for use in consumer goods, our revenues could be affected. If our principal competitors were to decrease their pricing, we could choose to do the same, which could adversely affect our margins and profitability. If we did not do the same, our revenues could be adversely affected due to the potential loss of sales or market share. Our revenue growth could also be adversely affected if we are not successful in developing new products for our customers or as a result of new product introductions by our competitors. In
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addition, more stringent new customer demands may require us to make internal investments to achieve or sustain competitive advantage and meet customer expectations.

Work disruptions or stoppages by our unionized workforce could cause interruptions in our operations.

As of April 1, 2021, approximately 235 of our 604 employees were members of a union. Although our relations with our three unions are stable, there is no assurance that we will not experience work disruptions or stoppages in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations and could adversely affect our relationships with our customers.

If we were to lose any of our key management personnel, we may not be able to fully implement our strategic plan, our system of internal controls could be impacted.

We rely on the continued services of key personnel involved in management, finance, product development, sales, manufacturing and distribution, and, in particular, upon the efforts and abilities of our executive management team. The loss of service of any of our key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and on our system of internal controls.

If we cannot attract and retain key management personnel, or if our search for qualified personnel is prolonged, our system of internal controls may be affected, which could lead to an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. In addition, it could be difficult, time consuming, and expensive to replace any key management member or other critical personnel, and no guarantee exists that we will be able to recruit suitable replacements or assimilate new key management personnel into our organization.

Covenants and other provisions in our credit arrangements could hinder our ability to operate. Our failure to comply with covenants in our credit arrangements could result in the acceleration of the debt extended under such agreements, limit our liquidity, and trigger other rights of our lenders.

Our credit arrangements (Note 5) contain a number of financial and other covenants that include provisions which require us, in certain circumstances, to meet certain financial tests. These covenants could hinder our ability to operate and could reduce our profitability. The lender may also terminate or accelerate our obligations under our credit arrangements upon the occurrence of various events in addition to payment defaults and other breaches. Any acceleration of our debt or termination of our credit arrangements would negatively impact our overall liquidity and might require us to take other actions to preserve any remaining liquidity. Although we anticipate that we will be able to meet the covenants in our credit arrangements, there can be no assurance that we will do so, as there are a number of external factors that affect our operations over which we have little or no control, that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Product recalls or other product liability claims could materially and negatively affect our business.

Selling products for human consumption involves inherent legal and other risks, including product contamination, spoilage, product tampering, allergens, or other adulteration. We could decide to, or be required to, recall products due to suspected or confirmed product contamination, adulteration, misbranding, tampering, or other deficiencies. Although we maintain product recall insurance, product recalls or market withdrawals could result in significant losses due to their costs, the destruction of product inventory, and lost sales due to the unavailability of the product for a period of time. We could be adversely affected if our customers lose confidence in the safety and quality of certain of our products, or if consumers lose confidence in the food and beverage safety system generally. Negative attention about these types of concerns, whether or not valid, may damage our reputation, discourage consumers from buying our products, or cause production and delivery disruptions.

We may also suffer losses if our products or operations cause injury, illness, or death. In addition, we could face claims of false or deceptive advertising or other criticism. A significant product liability or other legal judgment or a related regulatory enforcement action against us, or a significant product recall, may materially and adversely affect our reputation and profitability. Moreover, even if a product liability or other legal or regulatory claim is unsuccessful, has no merit, or is not pursued, the negative publicity surrounding assertions against our products or processes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

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We are subject to extensive regulation and taxation, as well as compliance with existing or future laws and regulations, which may require us to incur substantial expenditures.

We are subject to a broad range of federal, state, local, and foreign laws and regulations intended to protect public health and the environment. Our operations are also subject to regulation by various federal agencies, including the TTB, OSHA, the FDA, the EPA, and by various state and local authorities. We are also required to conduct business only with holders of licenses to import, warehouse, transport, distribute and sell beverage alcohol products. We cannot assure you that these and other governmental regulations applicable to our industry will not change or become more stringent. Such laws and regulations cover virtually every aspect of our operations, including production and storage facilities, distillation and maturation requirements, importing ingredients, importing and exporting products, distribution of beverage alcohol products, marketing, pricing, labeling, packaging, advertising, trade practices, water usage, waste water discharge, disposal of hazardous wastes and emissions, and other matters.

Violations of any of these laws and regulations may result in administrative, civil, or criminal fines or penalties being levied against us, including temporary or prolonged cessation of production, revocation or modification of permits, performance of environmental investigatory or remedial activities, voluntary or involuntary product recalls, or a cease and desist order against operations that are not in compliance with applicable laws. Changes in laws, regulatory measures, or governmental policies, or the manner in which current ones are interpreted, could cause us to incur material additional costs or liabilities, and jeopardize the growth of our business in the affected market. Specifically, governments may prohibit, impose, or increase limitations on advertising and promotional activities, or times or locations where beverage alcohol may be sold or consumed, or adopt other measures that could limit our opportunities to reach consumers or sell our products. Certain countries historically have banned all television, newspaper, magazine, and digital commerce/advertising for beverage alcohol products. Increases in regulation of this nature could substantially reduce consumer awareness of our products in the affected markets and make the introduction of new products more challenging. These matters may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.
Tariffs imposed by the U.S. and those imposed in response by other countries, as well as rapidly changing trade relations, could negatively impact our customers and have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Changes in U.S. and foreign governments' trade policies have resulted in, and may continue to result in, tariffs on imports into and exports from the U.S. The U.S. has imposed tariffs on imports from several countries, including those in the European Union. In response, the European Union has proposed or implemented their own tariffs on certain products including ours and our customers. Such retaliatory tariffs continue to remain in place and other countries may implement similar tariffs in the future. Any further deterioration of economic relations between the U.S. and other countries or any increase in existing tariffs or the imposition of additional tariffs could result in an increase in the price of our and our customer's products in those countries and could prompt consumers in those countries to seek alternative products and could potentially impact our financial performance and results of operations.
A failure of one or more of our key information technology ("IT") systems, networks, processes, associated sites, or service providers could have a negative impact on our business.

We rely on IT systems, networks, and services, including internet sites, data hosting and processing facilities and tools, hardware (including laptops and mobile devices), software and technical applications and platforms, some of which are managed and hosted by third party vendors to assist us in the management of our business. The various uses of these IT systems, networks, and services include, but are not limited to: hosting our internal network and communication systems; enterprise resource planning; processing transactions; summarizing and reporting results of operations; business plans, and financial information; complying with regulatory, legal, or tax requirements; providing data security; and handling other processes necessary to manage our business. Any failure of our IT systems or those of our third party vendors could adversely impact our ability to operate. Routine maintenance or development of new IT systems may result in systems failures, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Increased IT security threats and more sophisticated cyber crime pose a potential risk to the security of our IT systems, networks, and services, as well as the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of our data. This could lead to outside parties having access to our privileged data or strategic information or information regarding our employees, suppliers or customers. Any breach of our data security systems or failure of our IT systems may have a material adverse impact on our business operations and financial results. If the IT systems, networks or service providers we rely upon fail to function properly, or if we or our third party vendors suffer a loss or disclosure of business or other sensitive information due to any number of causes, including power outages, computer and telecommunications failures, viruses, phishing attempts, cyber attacks, malware and
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ransomware attacks, security breaches, natural disasters, and errors by employees, and the disaster recovery plans do not effectively address these failures on a timely basis, we may suffer interruptions in our ability to manage operations and reputational, competitive, or business harm, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. If our critical IT systems or back-up systems or those of our third party vendors were damaged or ceased to function properly, we might have to make a significant investment to repair or replace them. If a ransomware attack or other cybersecurity breach occurs, either internally or at our third-party technology service providers, it is possible we could be prevented from accessing our data which may cause interruptions or delays in our business, cause us to incur remediation costs or require us to pay ransom to a hacker which takes over our systems, or damage our reputation. In addition, such events could result in unauthorized disclosure of material confidential information, and we may suffer financial and reputational damage because of lost or misappropriated confidential information belonging to us or to our partners, our employees, customers, and suppliers. Additionally, we could be exposed to potential liability, litigation, governmental inquiries, investigations or regulatory enforcement actions and we could be subject to the payment of fines or other penalties, legal claims by our suppliers, customers or employees and significant remediation costs. Although we maintain insurance coverage for various cybersecurity risks, we may incur costs or financial losses that are either not insured against or not fully covered through our insurance.

Despite the protections we had in place, in May 2020, we were affected by a ransomware attack that temporarily disrupted production at our Atchison facilities. Our financial information was not affected and there is no evidence that any sensitive or confidential company, supplier, customer or employee data was improperly accessed or extracted from our network. The Company’s insurance is expected to provide coverage for business interruption losses, but there can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of possible insurance recoveries if ultimately claimed by the Company. Following the attack, we implemented a variety of measures to further enhance our cybersecurity protections and minimize the impact of any future attack. Cyber threats are constantly evolving however, and although we continually assess and improve our protections, there can be no guarantee that a future cyber event will not occur.

Damage to our reputation, or that of any of our key customers or their brands, could affect our business performance.

The success of our products depends in part upon the positive image that consumers have of our brands and the third party brands that use our products. Contamination, whether arising accidentally or through deliberate third party action, or other events that harm the integrity or consumer support for our and/or our customers’ products could affect the demand for our and/or our customers’ products. Unfavorable media, whether accurate or not, related to our industry, to us, our products, our brands, or to the brands that use our products, marketing, personnel, operations, business performance, or prospects could negatively affect our corporate reputation, stock price, ability to attract high quality talent, or the performance of our business. Negative publicity or commentary on social media outlets could cause consumers to react rapidly by avoiding our brands or by choosing brands offered by our competitors, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property rights or may be accused of infringing intellectual property rights of third parties.

We regard our trademarks, service marks, copyrights, patents, trade dress, trade secrets, proprietary technology, and similar intellectual property as critical to our success, and we rely on trademark, copyright, and patent law, trade secret protection, and confidentiality and/or license agreements with our employees, customers, and others to protect our proprietary rights. We may not be able to discover or determine the extent of any unauthorized use of our proprietary rights. Third parties that license our proprietary rights also may take actions that diminish the value of our proprietary rights or reputation. The protection of our intellectual property may require the expenditure of significant financial and managerial resources. Moreover, the steps we take to protect our intellectual property may not adequately protect our rights or prevent third parties from infringing or misappropriating our proprietary rights. Our intellectual property rights may not be upheld if challenged. Such claims, if they are proved, could materially and adversely affect our business. If we are unable to maintain the proprietary nature of our technologies, we may lose any competitive advantage provided by our intellectual property. We and our customers and other users of our products may be subject to allegations that we or they or certain uses of our products infringe the intellectual property rights of third parties. The outcome of any litigation is inherently uncertain. Any intellectual property claims, with or without merit, could be time-consuming and expensive to resolve, could divert management attention from executing our business plan, and could require us or our customers or other users of our products to change business practices, pay monetary damages, or enter into licensing or similar arrangements. Any adverse determination related to intellectual property claims or litigation could be material to our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

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Climate change, or legal, regulatory or market measures to address climate change, may negatively affect our business or operations, and water scarcity or quality could negatively impact our production costs and capacity.

Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may have an adverse effect on global temperatures, weather patterns, and the frequency and severity of extreme weather events and natural disasters. In the event that climate change, or legal, regulatory, or market measures enacted to address climate change, has a negative effect on agricultural productivity in the regions from which we procure agricultural products such as corn and wheat, we could be subject to decreased availability or increased prices for such agricultural products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. Increasing regulation of emissions could increase the cost of energy, including fuel, required to operate our facilities or transport and distribute our products, thereby substantially increasing the production, distribution, and supply chain costs associated with our products.

Water is the main ingredient in substantially all of our distillery products and is necessary for the production of our food ingredients. It is also a limited resource, facing unprecedented changes from climate change, increasing pollution, and poor management. As demand for water continues to increase, water becomes more scarce and the quality of available water deteriorates, we may be affected by increasing production costs or capacity constraints, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Our business may suffer from risks related to acquisitions and potential future acquisitions.

Part of our strategic business plan is to grow our business through acquisitions, and we continue to evaluate and engage in discussions concerning potential acquisition opportunities, some of which could be material. For example, in April 2021 we acquired Luxco, Inc. and its affiliated companies (together referred to as “Luxco” and the acquisition as the “Luxco Acquisition”). Failure to successfully integrate or otherwise realize the anticipated benefits of the Luxco Acquisition or other acquisitions could adversely impact our long-term competitiveness and profitability. The integration of any acquisition will involve a number of risks that could harm our financial condition, results of operations and competitive position. In particular:
the integration plans for our acquisitions are based on benefits that involve assumptions as to future events, including our ability to successfully achieve anticipated synergies, leveraging our existing relationships, as well as general business and industry conditions, many of which are beyond our control and may not materialize. Unforeseen factors may offset components of our integration plans in whole or in part. As a result, our actual results may vary considerably, or be considerably delayed, compared to our estimates;
the integration process could disrupt the activities of the businesses that are being combined. The combination of companies requires, among other things, coordination of administrative and other functions. In addition, the loss of key employees, customers or vendors of acquired businesses could materially and adversely impact the integration of the acquired businesses;
the execution of our integration plans may divert the attention of our management from other key responsibilities;
our financial results may be negatively impacted by cash expenses and non-cash charges incurred in connection with an acquisition if goodwill or other intangible assets we acquire become impaired;
we may enter new markets or markets in which we have limited prior experience;
we may incur substantial indebtedness to finance an acquisition, enhancing our vulnerability to increased debt service requirements should interest rates rise, reducing the amount of expected cash flow available for other purposes, including capital expenditures and acquisitions, and limiting our flexibility in planning for or reacting to changes in our businesses and industries;
we may assume unanticipated liabilities and contingencies or other exposures (including regulatory risks) for which we do not have adequate insurance coverage, indemnification or other protection; or
our acquisition targets could fail to perform in accordance with our expectations at the time of purchase.

Our ability to grow through the acquisition of additional brands is also dependent upon identifying acceptable acquisition targets and opportunities, our ability to consummate prospective transactions on favorable terms, or at all, and the availability of capital to complete the necessary acquisition arrangements. We intend to finance our brand acquisitions through a combination of our available cash resources, third-party financing and, in appropriate circumstances, the further issuance of equity and/or debt securities. The issuance of our Common Stock or securities convertible into our Common Stock to fund an acquisition could substantially dilute the ownership percentage of our current stockholders. For example, in connection with the Luxco Acquisition we issued approximately 5.0 million shares of Common Stock. In addition, shares issued in connection with future acquisitions could be publicly tradable, which could result in a material decrease in the market price of our Common Stock.

Acquiring additional brands could have a significant effect on our financial position and could cause substantial fluctuations in our quarterly and yearly operating results. Also, acquisitions could result in the recording of significant goodwill and intangible
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assets on our financial statements, the amortization or impairment of which would reduce reported earnings in subsequent years.

We incurred significant transaction and acquisition-related costs in connection with the Luxco Acquisition.

We incurred and are incurring a number of non-recurring costs associated with the Luxco Acquisition and combining the operations of Luxco’s with our own, including transaction fees and costs related to formulating and implementing integration plans with respect to the two companies. Although we expect that the elimination of duplicative costs, as well as the realization of other efficiencies related to the integration of the businesses, should allow us to offset integration-related costs over time, this net benefit may not be achieved in the near term, or at all.

The uncertain and rapidly changing COVID-19 pandemic could disrupt or otherwise negatively impact our operations, including the demand for our products and our ability to produce and deliver our products.

The ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic has resulted in a widespread health crisis, which has negatively impacted and could continue to negatively impact the global economy. The near and long-term impacts of COVID-19 are unknown and impossible to predict with any level of certainty. The global and regional impact of the pandemic, including official or unofficial quarantines and governmental restrictions on activities taken in response to the outbreak, could have a negative impact on our operations, including voluntary or mandatory temporary closures of our facilities or offices; interruptions in our supply chain, which could impact the cost or availability of raw materials; disruptions or restrictions on our ability to travel or to market and distribute our products; reduced consumer demand for our products or those of our customers due to bar and restaurant closures or reduced consumer traffic in bars, restaurants and other locations where our products or those of our customers are sold; and labor shortages.

Furthermore, our facilities and those of our customers and suppliers have been required to comply with additional regulations and may be required to comply with new regulations imposed by state and local governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including COVID-19 safety guidance for production and manufacturing facilities. Compliance with these measures, or new measures, may cause increases in the cost, or delays or reduction in the volume, of products produced at our facilities or those of our suppliers. The COVID-19 outbreak has disrupted credit markets, and may continue to disrupt or negatively impact credit markets, which could adversely affect the availability and cost of capital. Such impacts could limit our ability to fund our operations and satisfy our obligations.

The response to COVID-19 has resulted in social distancing, travel bans, temporary closures of businesses, shelter-in-place orders, and quarantines, among other measures. Although certain of the restrictions have begun, and may continue, to ease in some places, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has limited and may continue to limit access to our facilities, customers, management, support staff, professional advisors and our independent auditors. These factors, in turn, may not only impact our operations, financial condition and demand for our products but our overall ability to react timely to mitigate the impact of this ongoing event. Also, these measures may continue to hamper our efforts to comply with our filing obligations with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The extent of the impact on the Company’s business, financial condition, and results of operations is dependent on the length and severity of the pandemic. Vaccines to prevent COVID-19 were approved by health agencies in the U.S. and other countries in which the Company operates, which began to be administered near the end of calendar year 2020. Distribution of the vaccines has been slower than anticipated. In addition, new strains of the virus appear to have increased transmissibility, which could complicate treatment and vaccination programs. The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented situation and the Company's understanding of and response to its impacts is changing and evolving. The additional risk factors identified here are based upon information known at this time. The COVID-19 pandemic may adversely impact the Company's business, financial condition, and results of operations in one or more ways not identified to date.

RISKS SPECIFIC TO OUR DISTILLERY PRODUCTS AND LUXCO BRANDED SPIRITS SEGMENTS

The relationship between the price we pay for grain and the sales prices of our distillery co-products can fluctuate significantly and negatively impact our business.

Distillers feed, fuel grade alcohol, and corn oil are the principal co-products of our alcohol production process and can contribute in varying degrees to the profitability of our Distillery Products segment. Distillers feed and corn oil are sold for prices which historically have tracked the price of corn, but are also susceptible to other factors. In the case of distillers feed, other factors could include weather, other available feedstock, and global trade relations. In the case of corn oil, other factors could include soy oil and the overall level of ethanol production. We sell fuel grade alcohol, the prices for which typically, but
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not always, have tracked price fluctuations in gasoline prices. As a result, the profitability of these products could be adversely affected, which could be material to our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Our strategic plan involves significant investment in the aging of barreled distillate. Decisions concerning the quantity of maturing stock of our aged distillate could materially affect our future profitability.

There is an inherent risk in determining the quantity of maturing stock of aged distillate to lay down in a given year for future sales as a result of changes in consumer demand, pricing, new brand launches, changes in product cycles, increase in competitive supply, and other factors. Demand for products could change significantly between the time of production and the date of sale. It may be more difficult to make accurate predictions regarding new products and brands. Inaccurate decisions and/ or estimations could lead to an inability to supply future demand or lead to a future surplus of inventory and consequent writedown in the value of maturing stocks of aged distillate. As a result, our business, financial condition, or results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Warehouse expansion issues could negatively impact our operations and our business.

Our future business operations may require additional warehouse capacity. In the event additional warehouse capacity is required, there is the potential risk of completion delays, including risk of delay associated with required permits and cost overruns, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Class action or other litigation relating to alcohol abuse or the misuse of alcohol could adversely affect our business.

Our industry faces the possibility of class action or similar litigation alleging that the continued excessive use or abuse of beverage alcohol has caused death or serious health problems. It is also possible that governments could assert that the use of alcohol has significantly increased government funded health care costs. Litigation or assertions of this type have adversely affected companies in the tobacco industry, and it is possible that we, as well as our customers and suppliers, could be named in litigation of this type.

Also, lawsuits have been brought in a number of states alleging that beverage alcohol manufacturers and marketers have improperly targeted underage consumers in their advertising. Plaintiffs in these cases allege that the defendants’ advertisements, marketing and promotions violate the consumer protection or deceptive trade practices statutes in each of these states and seek repayment of the family funds expended by the underage consumers. While we have not been named in these lawsuits, we could be named in similar lawsuits in the future. Any class action or other litigation asserted against us could be expensive and time-consuming to defend against, depleting our cash and diverting our personnel resources and, if the plaintiffs in such actions were to prevail, our business could be harmed significantly.

A change in public opinion about alcohol could reduce demand for our products.

For many years, there has been a high level of social and political attention directed at the beverage alcohol industry. The attention has focused largely on public health concerns related to alcohol abuse, including drunk driving, underage drinking, and the negative health impacts of the abuse and misuse of beverage alcohol. Anti-alcohol groups have, in the past, advocated successfully for more stringent labeling requirements, higher taxes, and other regulations designed to discourage alcohol consumption. More restrictive regulations, higher taxes, negative publicity regarding alcohol consumption and/or changes in consumer perceptions of the relative healthfulness or safety of beverage alcohol could decrease sales and consumption of alcohol, and thus, the demand for our products. This could, in turn, significantly decrease both our revenues and our revenue growth and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. Changes in consumer preferences and purchases, and our ability to anticipate or react to them, could negatively affect our business results.

We operate in highly competitive markets, and our success depends on our continued ability to offer our customers and consumers appealing, high-quality products. In recent years there has been increased demand for the products we produce, including, in particular, increased demand for bourbons and rye whiskeys. Customer and consumer preferences and purchases may shift due to a host of factors, many of which are difficult to predict, including:
demographic and social trends;
economic conditions;
product innovations
public health policies and initiatives;
changes in government regulation and taxation of beverage alcohol products;
the expansion of, legalization of, and increased acceptance or use of, marijuana; and
changes in travel, leisure, dining, entertaining, and beverage consumption trends.
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Our success depends in part on fulfilling available opportunities to meet consumer needs and anticipating changes in consumer preferences with successful new products and product innovations. If our customers and consumers shift away from spirits (particularly brown spirits, such as our premium bourbon and rye whiskeys), our business, financial condition, or results of operations could be adversely affected.

In addition, our continued success depends, in part, on our ability to develop new products. The launch and ongoing success of new products are inherently uncertain especially with regard to their appeal to consumers. The launch of a new product can give rise to a variety of costs and an unsuccessful launch, among other things, can affect consumer perception of existing brands and our reputation. Unsuccessful implementation or short-lived popularity of our product innovations may result in inventory write-offs and other costs.

Changes in excise taxes, incentives and customs duties related to products containing alcohol could adversely affect our business.

Products containing alcohol are subject to excise taxation in many markets at the federal, state and/or local level. Any increase in federal, state or local excise taxes could have an adverse effect on our business by increasing prices and reducing demand, particularly if excise tax levels increase substantially relative to those for beer and wine. In addition, products containing alcohol are the subject of customs duties in many countries around the world. An unanticipated increase in customs duties in the markets where we may sell our products could also adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

Failure of our distributors to distribute our products adequately within their territories could adversely affect our business.

We are required by law to use state-licensed distributors or, in 17 states known as “control states,” state-owned agencies performing this function, to sell our products to retail outlets, including liquor stores, bars, restaurants and national chains in the United States. We have established relationships for our brands with a limited number of wholesale distributors; however, failure to maintain those relationships could significantly and adversely affect our business, sales and growth. We currently distribute our products in all 50 states.

Over the past decade there has been increasing consolidation, both intrastate and interstate, among distributors. As a result, many states now have only two or three significant distributors. Also, there are several distributors that now control distribution for several states. If we fail to maintain good relations with a distributor, our products could, in some instances be frozen out of one or more markets entirely. The ultimate success of our products also depends in large part on our distributors’ ability and desire to distribute our products to our desired U.S. target markets, as we rely significantly on them for product placement and retail store penetration. In addition, all of our distributors also distribute competitive brands and product lines. We cannot assure you that our U.S. distributors will continue to purchase our products, commit sufficient time and resources to promote and market our brands and product lines, or that they can or will sell them to our desired or targeted markets. If they do not, our sales will be harmed, resulting in a decline in our results of operations.

Moreover, the retail industry, particularly in Europe, North America and other countries in which we operate, continues to consolidate, resulting in larger retailers with increased purchasing power, which may affect our competitiveness in these markets. Larger retailers may seek to improve their profitability and sales by asking for lower prices or increased trade spending. The efforts of retailers could result in reduced profitability for the distilled spirits industry as a whole and indirectly adversely affect our financial results.

Failure of our products to secure and maintain listings in the control states could adversely affect our business.

In the control states, the state liquor commissions act in place of distributors and decide which products are to be purchased and offered for sale in their respective states. Products selected for listing in control states must generally reach certain volumes and/or profit levels to maintain their listings. Products in control states are selected for purchase and sale through listing procedures, which are generally made available to new products only at periodically scheduled listing interviews. Products not selected for listings can only be purchased by consumers in the applicable control state through special orders, if at all. If, in the fu